Clip:  “In the week following the Emperor’s order to cease hostilities, U.S. planes on photo-reconnaissance missions over Japan were twice attacked by enemy interceptors.  On 17 August, four B-32s were attacked over Tokyo by an estimated 10 Japanese fighters, of which two were probably destroyed and a third damaged. The same day, three other photo planes over Yokosuka and Miyakonojo were met by antiaircraft fire. On the 18th, two unescorted reconnoitering B-32s over Tokyo were attacked by 14 enemy fighters. An aerial photographer in one plane was killed, two of the crew were wounded, and both planes were heavily damaged. Our aircraft retaliated by shooting down two of the Japanese attackers and probably destroying two more. This attack occurred only a few hours after the Japanese government had accepted General MacArthur’s instructions to fly a peace delegation to Manila on the following day.”

 

Remember Dec. 7th 311 February 1946
From:     Commander in Chief, 
          U.S. Pacific Fleet 
          and Pacific Ocean 
          Areas.
To:       Chief of Naval 
          Operations.
Subject:  Report of Surrender 
          and Occupation of 
          Japan.
…Orders to “Cease fire” were transmitted to the Pacific Fleet and all other units under the command of Fleet Admiral Nimitz almost at once after President Truman’s announcement on the 15th [August 15, 1945] that Japan had accepted surrender terms. Unlike the Strategic Air Force, the THIRD Fleet and all other Pacific naval forces had previously been ordered by Fleet Admiral Nimitz to continue offensive action against Japan “unless otherwise specifically directed,” and it was only because otherwise prevented that the THIRD Fleet made no strikes on the 11th and 12th. In the first instance, scheduled fueling operations had taken the fleet out of action, and on the 12th a threatening hurricane had forced Admiral Halsey to cancel all strikes and steer to avoid the storm. Fleet Admiral Nimitz warned that “vigilance against Japanese attacks. . .should be exercised even if a general surrender should suddenly be announced.”  The 13th saw the resumption of attacks on TOKYO by planes of TF 38, and the 14th was occupied with refueling operations in preparation for renewed strikes on 15 August.
At 0411 on the 15th, the carriers, having returned to a launching point 110 miles southeast of Tokyo, sent attacks against the airfields on Honshu; but at 0633 ComTHIRDFleet relayed a message received at 0615 from Cincpac which ordered him to “Suspend attack air operations.”  The 103 planes comprising the first strike had already dropped their bombs, but the “cease fire” message caught the 73 planes of the second strike enroute to their targets. These planes jettisoned their bombs and returned to their carriers.
Thirty-five minutes after the victory ensign had been hoisted on the flagship, however, a Japanese bomber was shot down near the task force, and before the afternoon was over, seven additional Japanese aircraft were destroyed as they approached the fleet.  At 1600, the task force proceeded toward a position about 300 miles southeast of Tokyo to await further orders. As a result of these incursions Cincpac requested the Supreme Commander to inform Japanese authorities that our own measures for defense would require our naval forces to destroy any Japanese aircraft approaching our dispositions.
In mid-afternoon of the 15th, the THIRD Fleet received ALPOA 579, which ordered it to “Cease offensive operations against Japanese forces. Continue searches and patrols. Maintain defensive and internal security measures at highest level and beware of. . . last moment attacks by enemy forces or individuals.” Such an order had been anticipated by the Commander THIRD Fleet, and appropriate steps had been taken to carry it out.
In the week following the Emperor’s order to cease hostilities, U.S. planes on photo-reconnaissance missions over Japan were twice attacked by enemy interceptors.  On 17 August, four B-32s were attacked over Tokyo by an estimated 10 Japanese fighters, of which two were probably destroyed and a third damaged. The same day, three other photo planes over Yokosuka and Miyakonojo were met by antiaircraft fire. On the 18th, two unescorted reconnoitering B-32s over Tokyo were attacked by 14 enemy fighters. An aerial photographer in one plane was killed, two of the crew were wounded, and both planes were heavily damaged. Our aircraft retaliated by shooting down two of the Japanese attackers and probably destroying two more. This attack occurred only a few hours after the Japanese government had accepted General MacArthur’s instructions to fly a peace delegation to Manila on the following day.In what was probably the final naval action of the war, a submarine, presumably Russian, was reported by Japanese General Headquarters to have sunk four Japanese merchant vessels on 22 August, in the coastal waters of northern Hokkaido.
Conference in Manila–In response to instructions of the Supreme Commander, a 16-man delegation was sent by air to Manila on 19 August to receive surrender terms. . . .
Capture of Japanese Submarines–At about 1020 on 27 August, in position 38° 40′ N., 143 12′ E. (east of northern Honshu), planes of TG 38.1 sighted a Japanese submarine on course 000° T., proceeding at a speed of 12 knots. The submarine was flying a Japanese ensign and a black flag. Fifty minutes later, TG 38.1 planes sighted a second Japanese submarine on course 290° T., moving at a speed of 10 knots, a short distance to the south and east of the first submarine.
Two destroyers were dispatched from TG 38.1 to intercept and board each submarine, and Commander THIRD Fleet ordered the submarines taken to Guam, if sufficient fuel remained on board; otherwise, they should be taken to Sagami Wan. At the same time, submarine prize crews were ordered from PROTEUS (AS) to board the Japanese submarines. MURRAY and DASHIELL (DDs) intercepted one submarine, which turned out to be the A-14.
As the boarding party, consisting of four officers and 14 men from MURRAY, approached the submarine, they could see the Japanese writing with chalk on the conning tower, “I am navigating for Ominato”. No Japanese ensign was flying. After the party had gained the deck of the submarine and received an affirmative answer to the question submitted to the Japanese captain as to whether he surrendered, a search party of five men accompanied by a Japanese officer guide left the bridge to inspect the space below decks.
When the Japanese commanding officer was informed that the two destroyers would sink him if he attempted to submerge, he replied that “Our men have been told war conditions ended, and that we (the officers) are ordered by our Emperor to obey instructions of American commanders.” He stated further that all explosives, including torpedoes, had been jettisoned on 22 August, together with all logs, charts, documents, and small arms. At 1334 the boarding party hoisted the American Flag to the top of the No. 2 periscope. At approximately the same time, orders were received from MURRAY that the boarding party was to take the submarine to Sagami Wan, in spite of the Japanese commanding officer’s insistence that his orders required him to proceed to Ominato.
The searching party inspected the engineering spaces, living compartments, storerooms, and torpedo tubes, but found no explosives or small arms. Having exchanged two members of the boarding party for four other enlisted men in order to obtain a more balanced prize crew, the officer-in-charge ordered the A-14 to get underway at 1500. The run to Sagami Wan was made with a Japanese OOD and helmsman on the bridge acting upon orders of the particular boarding officer having the conn, while the Japanese engineers on duty in the engineering spaces acted upon orders of the American engineering watch.
The A-14 was of the latest type, having been launched 20 months previously by the Kawasaki Shipbuilding Company at Kobe, and commissioned five months prior to her capture. This was not only the Japanese captain’s first submarine duty, but the first for the majority of his officers and men. The A-14 had left the submarine base at Ominato on her first patrol on 17 July 1945, her mission being to supply the Japanese garrison at Truk with approximately 25 tons of provisions and machine gun ammunition. She passed “many” U.S. ships and planes between Saipan and Guam, but was under orders to deliver the cargo and not to attack. The Japanese commanding officer emphasized that he had never sunk an American ship.

Source:  Report of Surrender and Occupation of Japan, Memorandum, CinCPac & POA Serial 0395 of 11 February 1946, Office of the Chief of Naval Operations, Navy Department, Washington, D.C., May 9, 1946, pp. 4-6.

Image: Library of Congress, Remember Dec. 7th! by Allen Saalburg for Office of U.S. War Information, 1942.
http://www.forgottenwarstories.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/Remember-Dec.-7th-3.jpghttp://www.forgottenwarstories.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/Remember-Dec.-7th-3.jpgstevenhardestyWW2combat,pearl harbor,vietnam war,world war IIClip:  'In the week following the Emperor's order to cease hostilities, U.S. planes on photo-reconnaissance missions over Japan were twice attacked by enemy interceptors.  On 17 August, four B-32s were attacked over Tokyo by an estimated 10 Japanese fighters, of which two were probably destroyed and a third damaged....Recovering forgotten and overlooked military history