WW2

The Well-Dressed Airman (1945)

Pacific Ocean Area CLOTHING & EQUIPMENT   ...It will be found that "travel light" is a good rule for AAF personnel.  (Such items as steel helmets, weapons and gas masks will not, of course, be discarded to apply this rule.)  Climatic dampness causes clothing to mould rapidly and extra items should be aired frequently.  A few coat hangers are useful for this purpose. 3.  DESIRABLE ITEMS OF EQUIPMENT: a.  All Personnel: Raincoat, House slippers, Cigarette lighter, Swimming trunks, Bath clogs (a must), Talcum powder, Mirror, Nail clippers or file, Fountain pen and pencil, Sewing kit, Short wave radio, Extra insignia,…
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WW2

Rescue by Periscope, How to (1945)

7.  SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS: …c.  Where a submarine is unable to approach a survivor on the surface because of the proximity of enemy shore batteries or strafing by enemy planes, the submarine may attempt to pick up the survivor by approaching submerged and towing him by periscope to a position where it can surface. The submarine should perform the operation at not more than three knots. It should approach the survivor from upwind and, if possible, on such a course that the survivor will not be towed closer to the enemy shore before the retirement course is set. In the early…
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WW2

Camouflaging the South Pacific (1943)

Clip:  I saw jeeps driven along the beach within plain view of the CAPE ENDAIADERE and the Japanese, and with one of our headquarters located in a native village just back from this beach. I saw men paddling collapsible Australian assault boats in the same area without any military reason, this all in broad daylight and much Japanese air activity, and with the knowledge of their officers and under their observation. USS Missouri, Korea, 1950  Image Wikimedia Commons HEADQUARTERS ARMY GROUND FORCES Army War College Washington, February 20, 1943 SUBJECT: Observer's Report. CHRISTMAS ISLAND was the best example that I…
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Watching Movies with the Enemy

Bougainville had been secured, but there were still about 20,000 Japanese on the other side of the island. There had been no major engagement since the 'Battle of Hill 700,' a victory for the 37th that secured the island. The just lived on their side of the island, and we lived on ours with a well-established perimeter defense. Sometimes a couple of them would slip into our open-air theater and watch movies, or scrounge for food. They were more or less harmless. Their supply lines were hopelessly cut and pilots destroyed their gardens. They were slowly starving. Source: Lynn L.…
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